I found this in an email somewhere and thought it was so funny I had to share it with you. The email was dated 1996, so the event in question happened sometime around 1990. My comments in brackets. - Jonah

Farb Central

About six years back, my pard and I decided to see how many events we could do in one year. [Obviously single or well on the way to a divorce.] We do not venture north of Gettysburg much, as we are spoiled on all the wonderful events on the actual battlefields here in Maryland and in Virginia. I was however intrigued by an ad in the Camp Chase Gazette, for an Analomink, NY event. Soon after arriving at this event, we forever after called it "Analmink". The ad stated, "Indiscriminate firing of weapons in camp is encouraged!"

I'm convinced that surveyors within 70 miles of this place would have been put out of business, for lack of yellow survey tape, as it had all been bought up and sewn to the uniforms of these guys. 99% of the people there were dismounted cavalry.

The weapon of choice was the chromed Remington revolver, with at least two extra cylinders. The "battlefield" was a baseball field next to a bar (yes a saloon, tavern). When any of the combatants needed to reload, they entered the bar, ordered a beer and sat on the bar stool to reload. [An amenity.] Our mouths were agape by time the "battle scene" was ready to start, as there'd been continuous firing going on all day. The small valley, where the camp was situated, was covered by a thick cloud of burnt powder smoke.

Suddenly from out of nowhere, a dilapidated pick-up truck hove into view with fenders flapping and dragging what was supposed to pass as a horse trailer. The engine gave off a cacophony of grinding noises and smoke. Various and sundry engine parts and tools were in the bed, along with a rebuilt "big horn" saddle with the horn cut off. The doors were emblazoned with a crude, handwritten legend: "Rebel Construction Co." Out jumps a young man, somewhat lost in the cloud of dust, exhaust fumes and the accumulated pall from the morning's unbridled skirmishing. He stood akimbo, hands on hips and announced for all to hear: "I'm Lt. (name deleted). I've just completed officer's school, so I'll take charge of all "Rebel" cavalry." [Assertiveness training obviously formed a part of officer school.] We looked at each other with mild amusement and continued to stir the beans we were preparing for lunch. Somehow the Lt. had enough native savvy to realize that he was not going to be carried into battle on our shoulders and he went about his business, tacking up his horse.

He was the only other local reenactor who was mounted, except for Rush's Lancers. This group contained 19 troopers, all of which had deadly-looking lances to go with their chromed Remingtons, but only one horse among them. Their cavalry boots were home-altered Dingos that had extra leather sewn on the tops. They all wore scarlet hankies about their necks and appeared very serious about their impression. [Well, at least they were all attired the same. You have got to give them that.] However, we did have to stifle laughter when their bugler called them "to horse." They all lined up with their lances, dismounted, except for the one guy whose turn it was to use the horse. Once the battle was joined, it overflowed the ball field and continued up the mountainside. At one point we spotted a Louisiana flag and rode over to warn, what we mistook to be a true southern unit, of a Yankee flanking move. The "Col.", covered in yellow survey tape and with an obvious NJ accent rallied his men with the cry: "Git youse guns goys, we gotta killed some Yankees heah!" It was not hard for the spectators to know where the combatants were, for the cloud of gun smoke that continually shifted back and forth across the face of the mountain.

Later, when we figured all black powder had to have been expended, the weary fighters came off the mountain and entered the bar to reload and refresh, immediately after which, the combat was renewed. Nobody was safe, even in the portajohns (doors were kicked in, in order to fire upon the hapless occupants). [!] As we continued to observe this spectacle, an officer entered our camp to assign picket duty for the night. We allowed as how we did not mind standing guard, but what in God's name were we to guard against, as every "no-no" of reenacting was already being carried on in the open during daylight? The officer told us that we needed to guard against "civilians" participating in the skirmishes. "Well, golly Sir, look at this herd. Most of these guys are wearing Levi's and white shirts. Who can tell who's a civilian?" He blew off our concerns and assigned us an hour to "stand watch."

At 2330 hrs., we were sitting in the bleachers with a cold beer watching in amazement as the lines formed for yet another charge. These guys never tired of burning powder. When we loaded our mounts for the trip back to Maryland, one of the "organizers" came over to shake our hands and express his hope that we had enjoyed the "premiere Civil War event in NY!" Our stomachs hurt and tears ran down our cheeks from the laughter that was generated on the ride back home. [Sounds like a successful weekend, then. Laughter will add years to one's life, authentic reenacting won't.] We relived what we'd seen, but we still did not believe it. I've related this story several times and even carried the ad for awhile. The ad said it all:"indiscriminate firing in camp is encouraged!"

Steven in Maryland, 4th Virginia Cavalry